White Cube : Nimrod

Nimrod, close-up

Nimrod, close-up, sweet beton objects inside coca cola

Nimrod, Garden of watermelons

Nimrod, Garden of watermelons

Nimrod, Garden of the watermelons, after 1 month

Nimrod, Garden of the watermelons, after 1 month

Nimrod, Garden of watermelons

Nimrod, Garden of watermelons, after 4 months

Nimrod, Texture of the concrete carpet

Nimrod, Texture of the concrete carpet

Nimrod, cracks in the sumo ring

Nimrod, cracks in the sumo ring

Nimrod, first view inside the greenhouse, The sumo ring and the frozen living-room

Nimrod, first view inside the greenhouse, The sumo ring and the frozen living-room

Nimrod, Inside view on the sweet beton objects

Nimrod, Inside view on the sweet beton objects

Nimrod, Inside view on the sweet beton objects in the frozen living-room

Nimrod, Inside view on the sweet beton objects in the frozen living-room

Nimrod, Upper view on the sweet beton objects

Nimrod, Upper view on the sweet beton objects

 In Sweet Tone

A garden is seen when walking up the stairs in the direction of the greenhouse. In it is a plastic swing covered in concrete stucco which is gradually cracking with pieces falling off. At the side of the greenhouse is a watermelon patch with fruit whose sweet and juicy flesh has been emptied and replaced with poured concrete. Entering the greenhouse, a voice is heard reciting a text in Japanese. The text, inspired by the writer Georges Perec, is about concrete and belongs to a collection of texts I wrote called Concrete Poetry. A round 4.55 diameter concrete cast, sown with colorful gummy bear candy is the first thing seen in the space. The sink on the right hand side was replaced with a tin tub used for working with concrete in which are three casts of sweet concrete immersed in a pool of coca cola. Dozens of sweet concrete casts are scattered throughout the space, together with various pieces of living room furniture all covered in concrete stucco.

When I was given this space I thought about the word “greenhouse” and that led me to associations of a warm, embracing, accepting home. During the work processes I thought about what home meant to me. I grew up in a warm and loving house with guests around the kitchen table, which, as opposed to the living room was the heart of the house. As far as I was concerned, the living room was frozen. We hardly every entertained guests in the living room and there wasn’t even a television there. It seemed to me like a Le Corbusier sofa museum, with an Aalto lounge chair, a Rietveld chair, paintings, sculptures, lots of books, and much more. I found other places and spaces to be in, my own room, the patio and the garden. Places that were both inside and out. Since then the place that is both inside and out has always attracted me.

Crédits photographiques : Nimrod